Interesting facts from around the world: What and how do people drink in different countries?

Data publikacji: 2020-09-08 00:00:00

Each country has its own specialties and traditions worth exploring. This week we'll find out what and how people drink in four countries: Japan, USA, Vietnam and Ireland. And next week we'll write about what and how people drink in Hungary.

Japan

For the Japanese, alcohol is an important aspect of their national culture and everyday life. Residents of large cities who finish their work late are eager to visit the local bars before going home. The Japanese are encouraged to integrate with their colleagues, and this has its own special term – nomination. This is a combination of two words: Japanese nomu, which means "drink", and English communication, which stands for "communication".

There are several alcohols typical for this country. One of them is shochu. It is a high percentage liquor that people willingly drink in bars. Depending on what it is produced from (it can be made from e.g. rice, potatoes or barley), it contains between 25 and 45 percent of alcohol.

However, the most recognisable Japanese alcohol is sake. Since this beverage is made from seeds and fermented, it is considered to be something between beer and wine.

USA

The United States is famous for its many alcohols: from whiskey and bourbon to wines and craft beers. There are also several iconic drink recipes which were created in this country.

The one especially worthy of attention is martini. From the end of the 19th century it has been prepared on the basis of gin and vermouth. It used to be served with a cherry or a slice of lemon. Today it is more often accompanied by green olives. It was already appreciated in the times of prohibition. People with power and social recognition were drinking it. Legend says that such a drink was first prepared by a bartender in the small Californian town of Martinez. Allegedly that is where the name of this drink comes from, although Americans take this story with a grain of salt. However, they are passionately careful about the best combination of alcohols in this concoction. There are at least a few theories on how to mix gin and vermouth appropriately.

Vietnam

The Vietnamese usually drink rice wine. In cities, however, beer is very popular. This is not particularly surprising, given the high temperatures in this country during the dry season. The golden drink quenches thirst and perfectly combines with many dishes of their local cuisine.

In the shops you can buy products of local breweries – Hanoi Beer or Saigon Beer, as well as other imported ones.

When it comes to the spirits, the ruou gao reigns in the north and the ruou de in the south of the country. These are distilled rice-based beverages.

The strangest alcohol (for a European) is snake wine. It is also rice-based, but there is a reptile inside the bottle - a viper or a cobra (sometimes lizards, frogs and even... goat foetuses or cats). The Vietnamese believe that this "animal bonus" ensures health and potency.

Ireland

The drinking culture in Ireland associated with going out for a beer or whiskey is known all around the world. In various parts of the globe we can find Irish-style pubs that are intended to replicate those on the islands. But it is not the decor or the type of drinks served that affects the atmosphere of these places.

For the Irish – pubs are an important aspect of social life. People of different ages, social status and a wide-range of incomes meet there. Until recently, the inhabitants of this country did not drink much at home, because alcohol was associated with social gatherings in the city.

During the national and religious feast of St. Patrick – the patron saint of Ireland, people drink beer that is dyed green. In the past, fasting was broken only on March 17 when alcohol was permitted. Hence the strong drinking tradition of the day.

Source: pl.wikipedia.org; ugotuj.to; traveligo.pl

 

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